Homeschooling and the SBC

Discuss current news and trends taking place in the Southern Baptist Convention.

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Re: Homeschooling and the SBC

Postby Dave Roberts » Mon Jun 24, 2013 8:44 am

Sandy, I have wondered why you did not respond to my questions here. They are not intended as some trick but as an effort to to understand what you mean by "teaching the full truth about evolution." If this is not clear, I'll try to clarify.

Dave Roberts wrote:Actually, there are many Christian understandings of what "creation ex nihilo" means. The Catholic Church, until well after Galileo, taught that the earth was created first and then the sun, moon and stars which all revolved around the earth. In "The Fundamentals" pamphlets of the early 1900's, the emphasis was on a seven-day literal creation. Langdon Gilkey who wrote the definitive theology back in the 1960's spoke of periods and allowed for a much longer history. The Jesuit paleontologist, Pierre Tielhard de Chardin spoke of quantum leaps in an evolutionary process moving in his understanding toward the Omega Point. Francis Collins (Director of the Human Genome Project) and Paul Gibberson have written in terms of evolution through Bio-Logos. There are young earth creationists who say that fossils are God's way of testing our faith by planting what seems to contradict young earth creationism. All of these have been considered orthodox Christians by one or more groups. Sandy, could a disciple of Tielhard or of Collins and Gibberson be considered orthodox enough to teach in your school? Why or why not?
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Re: Homeschooling and the SBC

Postby Sandy » Mon Jun 24, 2013 8:56 am

Bruce Gourley wrote:Sandy, I truly do not understand why you insist upon betraying your Baptist faith heritage. Our faith forebears shed their blood to separate church and state, insisting that the government had no business allying with or peddling any faith, including Christianity. Many non-Baptist Christian leaders in the late 18th and early 19th centuries were angered that America had been founded as a secular nation, and denounced our nation's founders -- Washington, Jefferson, Madison and others -- as heretics and infidels for their part in leading America away from Christianity. Baptists, however, had finally fulfilled their two-centuries long quest, and were very pleased.


You are exactly right, Bruce. However, that was in a day and age when the churches and their ministers provided the education that people received, if they got it, and before the system controlled by the government became philosophically hostile to the church. Public education does not operate from a position of strict neutrality toward religion. I doubt very seriously that early Baptists ever counted on the government taking over responsibility for education, or that the system would come under the control of an enlightenment era philosophy that would use it to attempt to eliminate the influence of Christian faith in the culture. And I doubt they would have sat still for having their tax money used to pay for it.
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Re: Homeschooling and the SBC

Postby Bruce Gourley » Mon Jun 24, 2013 9:40 am

Bruce Gourley wrote:Sandy, I truly do not understand why you insist upon betraying your Baptist faith heritage. Our faith forebears shed their blood to separate church and state, insisting that the government had no business allying with or peddling any faith, including Christianity. Many non-Baptist Christian leaders in the late 18th and early 19th centuries were angered that America had been founded as a secular nation, and denounced our nation's founders -- Washington, Jefferson, Madison and others -- as heretics and infidels for their part in leading America away from Christianity. Baptists, however, had finally fulfilled their two-centuries long quest, and were very pleased.


Sandy wrote:You are exactly right, Bruce. However, that was in a day and age when the churches and their ministers provided the education that people received, if they got it, and before the system controlled by the government became philosophically hostile to the church. Public education does not operate from a position of strict neutrality toward religion. I doubt very seriously that early Baptists ever counted on the government taking over responsibility for education, or that the system would come under the control of an enlightenment era philosophy that would use it to attempt to eliminate the influence of Christian faith in the culture. And I doubt they would have sat still for having their tax money used to pay for it.


Actually, Baptists' championing of democracy and freedom of conscience for all preceded the Enlightenment -- and influenced John Locke, whose Enlightenment views were less radical than those of Baptists.

Also, the government today has no interest in eliminating Christian faith from culture, but instead maintains -- as our Baptist forefathers championed -- a free marketplace of religion in the public sphere, unaided by government and/or taxpayer dollars. Many Christians today, however, want the government to give preferential treatment to Christianity. This seems to be your position, a stance opposed by our Baptist forebears.

You also did not address the second part of my post: until a few decade ago, Baptists of all doctrinal stripes were opposed to government-sponsored Christian prayers and scripture reading (as well as prayers and scripture reading of any other faiths) in public schools, and insisted upon neutrality to religion in public schools.

When did you change your mind about this historical Baptist position?
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Re: Homeschooling and the SBC

Postby Timothy Bonney » Mon Jun 24, 2013 10:07 am

Sandy wrote:The fact that the public education system is controlled by a philosophical element that is antithetical to Christian faith has no bearing on the work of those Christians who remain and work within the system.


The fact is the above is just not true. I know it is the mythology you have to believe to continue to bash public schools and promote sectarian private Christian education. But it is just not true.

Your claims fall apart in front of anyone who knows the individual leaders and people you are talking about. You can go on and on all you want about "those Godless schools" but when the rest of us know many God fearing teachers, principals, and school administrators you sound completely out of touch with reality. You've swallowed a dogma that the sky is red when everyone can just look up and see that it is blue. Rant on all you want Sandy. The sky is still blue.

The way you are talking about public schools should remind you of the way people talk about Barack Obama. "He's a Muslim," "He's a socialist." Of course neither of those things is true and it is clear to most people that he is actually a Christian and a moderate Democrat. But that doesn't keep people from believing otherwise, facts be dam*ed.

There are two Sandys here on BL.com. One is a mainstream reasonable Sandy who, on many political issues, seems to come out as pretty reasonable moderate, and open minded. Then there is the fundamentalist Sandy who sees the Christian sky falling and the world being taken over by liberals, non-Christians, Godless evolutionists, and gay people.

Let me know when mainstream Sandy comes back, I enjoy talking with him.
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Re: Homeschooling and the SBC

Postby Sandy » Mon Jun 24, 2013 11:25 am

Bruce Gourley wrote:Also, the government today has no interest in eliminating Christian faith from culture, but instead maintains -- as our Baptist forefathers championed -- a free marketplace of religion in the public sphere, unaided by government and/or taxpayer dollars. Many Christians today, however, want the government to give preferential treatment to Christianity.


I don't know what Government's interest is regarding religion. But some elements of government, the public school system in particular, are a monopoly that has been taken over by secular humanists and liberals whose interest is in eliminating faith from the culture, a philosophy and agenda that they have made clear all along. The "head buried in the sand" approach taken by many Christians just makes advancing the agenda easier. I've been there, I've heard these people, I've seen the agenda in action, I've read the books that both outline what the secular humanists are doing, and those who oppose them.

Timothy Bonney wrote:The fact is the above is just not true. I know it is the mythology you have to believe to continue to bash public schools and promote sectarian private Christian education. But it is just not true.


Yet another head buried in the sand.
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Re: Homeschooling and the SBC

Postby Timothy Bonney » Mon Jun 24, 2013 11:26 pm

Sandy wrote:Yet another head buried in the sand.


:lol: Believe what you want Sandy, you do already. But then the Church scoffed at Galileo too and insisted on a earth centered universe. You are following after those in the Church who have always denied the discoveries of science rather than embracing the new and exciting things that we learn about God from such discoveries.

I look forward to the day when the whole Church quits trying to deny the truth found in science and reason to uphold ancient mythologies that really have nothing to do with the truth of the gospel. All truth comes from God. God needs no protection from the science nor do God's children.

Whose head IS buried in the sand?
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Re: Homeschooling and the SBC

Postby ET » Tue Jun 25, 2013 10:31 am

Wow!! I go on vacation and check back in for a moment and what do I find....Sandy is taking fire. Dang, Sandy, if I woulda known this would happen, I would have left you my BL flak jacket I put on before jumping into these discussions....ya'll have fun...back to Orlando and more volleyball for me. :wave:
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Re: Homeschooling and the SBC

Postby Sandy » Tue Jun 25, 2013 3:33 pm

Timothy Bonney wrote:
Sandy wrote:Yet another head buried in the sand.


:lol: Believe what you want Sandy, you do already. But then the Church scoffed at Galileo too and insisted on a earth centered universe. You are following after those in the Church who have always denied the discoveries of science rather than embracing the new and exciting things that we learn about God from such discoveries.

I look forward to the day when the whole Church quits trying to deny the truth found in science and reason to uphold ancient mythologies that really have nothing to do with the truth of the gospel. All truth comes from God. God needs no protection from the science nor do God's children.

Whose head IS buried in the sand?


I have no objection to teaching proven science. What I do object to is teaching theory regarding the origin of man that isn't proven, and in some cases is not scientific. But it is taught in the public school system as if it has already been settled, and in opposition to any view that there is a God who had anything to do with it.
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Re: Homeschooling and the SBC

Postby Chris » Wed Jun 26, 2013 9:31 pm

Sandy wrote:Well, those Baptists paid the taxes which will support those vouchers. Why should they pay for a public education system that they don't want to use, and which doesn't provide the quality of education that a private, Christian school can do?


I am a Baptist who has fathered zero children. Yet, I have paid City State and Federal taxes for 55 years to help support a free PUBLIC school system, so all children can have a k-12 education. If you don't like the schools I have provided for you (the most common reason is "they don't teach Adam and Eve") then feel free to go to a private school. But, don't use MY money for this luxury. Use your own.
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Re: Homeschooling and the SBC

Postby Sandy » Thu Jun 27, 2013 8:59 am

Chris wrote:
Sandy wrote:Well, those Baptists paid the taxes which will support those vouchers. Why should they pay for a public education system that they don't want to use, and which doesn't provide the quality of education that a private, Christian school can do?


I am a Baptist who has fathered zero children. Yet, I have paid City State and Federal taxes for 55 years to help support a free PUBLIC school system, so all children can have a k-12 education. If you don't like the schools I have provided for you (the most common reason is "they don't teach Adam and Eve") then feel free to go to a private school. But, don't use MY money for this luxury. Use your own.


I would be quite happy with any plan that allowed those Christians who do not want their children in a monopoly that provides a crappy education lacking any kind of educational quality and which denies that their faith and values are valid to use THEIR tax money for schools of their choosing. Choice is a great political word when it comes to allowing same sex marriage, or the murder of unborn souls, but somehow, it does not apply to people who believe in God and trust Jesus as savior and Lord, and want their kids in a school that provides academic quality and does not teach against their values. That is not a luxury, that is pure and basic religious freedom.
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Re: Homeschooling and the SBC

Postby Timothy Bonney » Thu Jun 27, 2013 6:02 pm

Sandy wrote:
I have no objection to teaching proven science. What I do object to is teaching theory regarding the origin of man that isn't proven, and in some cases is not scientific. But it is taught in the public school system as if it has already been settled, and in opposition to any view that there is a God who had anything to do with it.


Talk to some actual scientists Sandy. It is as close to proven as any theory ever gets. It does not deny that God did or didn't have anything to do with it. Evolution is about process and not ultimate origins. It is about what human beings can observe and not about what we can't.

If you want to believe that life doesn't evolve that is your right. As far as I'm concerned you can believe the earth is flat and still be a good guy and a good Christian. But I have to agree with Dave. Don't expect any of us to want our tax money to for promoting such viewpoints. Don't expect us to foot the bill for your religion.
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Re: Homeschooling and the SBC

Postby Sandy » Thu Jun 27, 2013 10:50 pm

Timothy Bonney wrote:
Sandy wrote:
I have no objection to teaching proven science. What I do object to is teaching theory regarding the origin of man that isn't proven, and in some cases is not scientific. But it is taught in the public school system as if it has already been settled, and in opposition to any view that there is a God who had anything to do with it.


Talk to some actual scientists Sandy. It is as close to proven as any theory ever gets. It does not deny that God did or didn't have anything to do with it. Evolution is about process and not ultimate origins. It is about what human beings can observe and not about what we can't.

If you want to believe that life doesn't evolve that is your right. As far as I'm concerned you can believe the earth is flat and still be a good guy and a good Christian. But I have to agree with Dave. Don't expect any of us to want our tax money to for promoting such viewpoints. Don't expect us to foot the bill for your religion.


Fine. I am all for your tax money not going to promote a viewpoint you don't like. That is exactly how hundreds of thousands of Christians who sent their kids to Christian schools, or home educate them, feel about it too. They should be allowed to designate their tax money to the schools they feel provide a quality education that supports their values. To force them to pay taxes to support a mediocre school system that teaches against their values is a violation of both separation of church and state and religious freedom. It's a violation of church and state because the government violates religious neutrality, and it is a violation of religious freedom because kids are a captive audience, and free expression is suppressed in the public education system. So you pay for whatever you want to, and be open minded and progressive enough to allow others the freedom to designate their tax money to whatever school they believe will best educate their children.

"As close to proven as any theory ever gets" is a clear statement that says it is still theory. There's a plethora of theory out there in the scientific realm that was once as close as it ever gets to proven that has been proven otherwise. Until it is, by scientific standards, it's not at all. And the flat earth argument just doesn't hold water. The Catholic church has a rich history of superstition, false teaching, bad guessing, and using worldly power to advance its means. Galileo's discovery rankled their feathers, but it didn't do anything to the accuracy or the truth of scripture, which does not declare a flat earth. That's an old chestnut.
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Re: Homeschooling and the SBC

Postby Dave Roberts » Fri Jun 28, 2013 7:57 am

Sandy, have you become acquainted with some of the best thinking in science and faith. Your students need to be aware of this organization as do your teachers. It is the BioLogos Foundation. Their website is http://biologos.org/
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Re: Homeschooling and the SBC

Postby Timothy Bonney » Fri Jun 28, 2013 9:35 am

Sandy wrote:Fine. I am all for your tax money not going to promote a viewpoint you don't like. That is exactly how hundreds of thousands of Christians who sent their kids to Christian schools, or home educate them, feel about it too. They should be allowed to designate their tax money to the schools they feel provide a quality education that supports their values.


No Sandy. Tax money goes for payment of government sponsored programs. Public Education for all children in the US is a function of our government. Private religious education is not a function of our government. It would be impossible to have a budget or a government if individuals could designate taxes just to the programs they happened to like. That isn't how representative government works. No program of any government could operate effectively if their funding was based on what people felt like giving to it.

I really think that Grace UMC does great work for the community I live in. That doesn't mean I should get to designate my taxes to it. Funding religious organizations isn't a function of government. Funding religious education isn't a function of government.
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Re: Homeschooling and the SBC

Postby Sandy » Fri Jun 28, 2013 12:20 pm

Timothy Bonney wrote:Private religious education is not a function of our government.


Then they need to get out of that business completely, and stop setting precedents which open the door to vouchers and school choice. Thousands of Christian and religious based colleges and universities accept both low interest student loans and educational opportunity grants which are funded by tax money. There are thousands of government programs which are taxpayer funded but operated by religious based or Christian colleges and universities. Some of the darling schools of the more left of center Baptist and Christian folks here, like Baylor, Wake Forest and SMU receive government dollars and grants for programs on their campuses. Fair is fair. If tax dollars shouldn't go to private religious education, then funding programs and grants received by private, religious schools shouldn't be happening.

And they need to insure that the public education system assumes a position of religious neutrality, instead of one of bias against Christianity, and particularly conservative Christianity because the fact is that they are not neutral, and that is a violation of religious freedom. "Equality of treatment," however, when applied to education, does not mean that no tax money should go to religiously based schools, it simply means that all religious schools, and any others that are not government operated, should have the same opportunity to receive support. This is a democracy with a republican form of government. Having a public education system funded by tax dollars is a monopoly and a principle that is incongruent with a government "of the people."
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Re: Homeschooling and the SBC

Postby Dave Roberts » Sun Jun 30, 2013 7:12 am

http://www.politicususa.com/2013/06/29/alecs-latest-scam-sending-public-school-dollars-corporate-owned-private-schools.html

This article certainly provides an interesting twist to the idea of using tax money for private education, especially those who support it most vigorously.
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Re: Homeschooling and the SBC

Postby Timothy Bonney » Sun Jun 30, 2013 9:07 am

Sandy you are mixing a lot of subjects in your most recent post. College education is another subject and off topic of funding public or private primary and secondary education. But I don't think religion programs should be funded at any school by the government.

Also, comparing a government program to a "monopoly" is also a big stretch. Next you will argue that we should have a competing army in the US because the US military is a "monopoly." Monopoly laws are about corporations and not basic government services. Public education is a basic necessary government service, not a monopoly any more than public roads are a monopoly.

But I don't know why I'm bothering to respond anymore. Since you think people like my wife are teaching anti-Christian values in the public schools I'm not sure you know enough about public schools to have a cogent conversation.

You are practically frothing at the mouth about schools being anti-Christian while I know my wife spent most of her time teaching handicapped children how to read and do their math. The broad sweeping generalizations you make just so don't match what any of us know who are closely involved with public schools. As I've said above, with a little time I could list numerous Christian people I know who are public school teachers, staff, and administrators. This whole conversation has a bizarre tinge because it seems to have so little connection with reality.
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Re: Homeschooling and the SBC

Postby Michael Wrenn » Sun Jun 30, 2013 2:51 pm

Timothy Bonney wrote:
Michael Wrenn wrote:Just want to say that homosexuality is not a "side" issue. New scripturally faithful groups such as the Anglican Church of North America (ACNA) and the Anglican Mission in the Americas (AMiA) certainly didn't think it was a side issue, as they thought it important enough to separate from the sodomite-affirming/celebrating Episcopal Church.


Simply because people can make mountains out of molehills it does not mean that molehills are actually mountains.


Simply because people want to ignore or deny the Biblical condemnation of sodomy does not change how God views the matter, either. And churches that affirm sodomy have departed the faith and should thus not be considered Christian churches.
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Re: Homeschooling and the SBC

Postby Michael Wrenn » Sun Jun 30, 2013 3:01 pm

I am as strong a proponent of Baptist principles as anyone could find, including church-state separation. Prior to my becoming a teacher and teaching in the public schools, I would have agreed with those on here who are opposing Sandy. But it's funny how actual real world experience can wake one up from liberal theory, and that's what happened to me from the time I got my first public school teaching job. I came to see that government had destroyed the public schools. And it's getting worse, not better.
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Re: Homeschooling and the SBC

Postby Haruo » Mon Jul 01, 2013 12:42 am

Michael Wrenn wrote:
Timothy Bonney wrote:
Michael Wrenn wrote:Just want to say that homosexuality is not a "side" issue. New scripturally faithful groups such as the Anglican Church of North America (ACNA) and the Anglican Mission in the Americas (AMiA) certainly didn't think it was a side issue, as they thought it important enough to separate from the sodomite-affirming/celebrating Episcopal Church.


Simply because people can make mountains out of molehills it does not mean that molehills are actually mountains.


Simply because people want to ignore or deny the Biblical condemnation of sodomy does not change how God views the matter, either. And churches that affirm sodomy have departed the faith and should thus not be considered Christian churches.

I presume (perhaps wrongly) that you are saying I am not a Christian, i.e., that what is true for churches is also true for believers. I am not sure what you mean by "affirm sodomy", but I do gather that you believe that what the King James version of the Bible calls "sodomy" includes what is nowadays called "committed same-sex relationships" or, where local law allows, "same-sex marriages". I think you're wrong (if I'm right in my guess as to how you see the terms), but I wouldn't go so far as to impugn your Christian belief or your salvation.

Board rules are fairly clear on not claiming each other here is not saved. I think. (Been awhile since I actually reviewed the terms.)
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Re: Homeschooling and the SBC

Postby TrudyU » Tue Jul 02, 2013 12:44 pm

Bruce Gourley wrote:Sandy, I truly do not understand why you insist upon betraying your Baptist faith heritage. Our faith forebears shed their blood to separate church and state, insisting that the government had no business allying with or peddling any faith, including Christianity. Many non-Baptist Christian leaders in the late 18th and early 19th centuries were angered that America had been founded as a secular nation, and denounced our nation's founders -- Washington, Jefferson, Madison and others -- as heretics and infidels for their part in leading America away from Christianity. Baptists, however, had finally fulfilled their two-centuries long quest, and were very pleased.

This heritage has been true for almost all of our history. In very recent history, in the early 1960s, Baptists -- liberal, progressive, moderate, conservative and fundamentalist -- collectively supported Supreme Court decisions outlawing government-sponsored prayer in public schools. As Baptists of old had insisted, these modern Baptists knew that government had no business allying with or peddling any faith; coerced faith is false faith.

That many Baptists today have turned their back on their faith traditions astounds me.

Today's public school system in America, in its secularness (thank you, Baptist forebears), is in some respects more Christian than many so-called Christian schools -- public schools strive to treat children equally, educate the poor and marginalized, follow the Baptist tradition of church state separation, and strive to teach truth when it comes to science (and other disciplines) rather than dispensing religious mythology (it is telling that only in the late 20th century did it become popular among some Christians to insist that Christians must believe in six-day creationism; and how would you like for your kids to be taught the Hindu creation story, or a Native American creation story, or fill in the blank).

The problem for some Christians today is that they want to indoctrinate their children in religious dogma, are afraid of people outside their religious ghetto, and are also afraid of following the search for truth, wherever that search leads. That people of God -- the God of all truth -- would be afraid of the search for truth is another thing that mystifies me.

(Disclaimer: I am a proud product of public schooling. And I'm very pleased that my child is in a public school.)


Ed: Bruce, I would say that many Baptist today have turned their back on public education to the detriment of both education and the church universal but to say that is the same as turning their back on their faith tradition is stretching the point. The old McGuffy reader of early American schools was full of specifically Christian indoctrination. And in your parents generation the majority of public schools where still propagating Christianity, usually of what ever protestant form other than Lutheran that was prominent in a given local. Lutherans like Catholics tended to prefer their own schools. My parents where products of public schools as where I and my children. I still am glad to support public schools but I am less than comfortable with the liberal stance of many public school teachers, I do not however agree with Sandy that this is some sort of conspiracy, I believe it reflects the failure of many churches to prepare people to live and teach in the larger society. BTW where did you ever encounter fundamentalist who opposed school prayer. But then I recall you tend to lump fundamentalist and conservatives, which was my only negative criticism of your first book. And when did you start including the term progressive in the religious spectrum, as if neither conservative or moderates could not be progressive.
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Re: Homeschooling and the SBC

Postby ET » Tue Jul 02, 2013 2:07 pm

I think it's a bit simplistic to presume that the primary reason for someone to attend a Christian school is due to the issue of evolution/creation. I've had a wide experience in the education world. Three of my four grandparents were public education teachers. My parents were career teachers in public education. I went to both public (1-3rd, 11th, 12th) and private schools (4th-10th), but the private school I attended was not explicitly Christian. I learned about evolution at both the public and private school. My brother went to a public middle school, but had a bad experience and begged my parents to go to a Christian school and they worked that out, even on their teacher salaries.

My two oldest children went to public schools almost all of their educational lives. Oldest was there up through 8th grade. Next one went up through 6th, then we home schooled a couple of years before going to the same private Christian school as the oldest. The youngest has been home schooled since the 3rd grade. We were happy with the school, but our youngest is a self-driven girl and moved along faster than her classmates and the teacher and my wife decided we needed to look for faster or more advanced coursework, so we ended up home schooling over a private school since there weren't any other alternatives within the local public school. Didn't have a thing to do with evolution or leftist teachers.

I think one other consideration is that not all kids who end up at Christian schools end up there because of the religious nature of the school. I know plenty of folks who have sent their kids to Christian schools here in Memphis and it's got more to do with the "private" part than the "Christian" part.

Next adventure in home schooling for us: our home schooler is going to play volleyball this year for the high school she would attend if she went to public school. Tennessee got around this year to passing a law to allow home schoolers to play for the public school in which they are zoned.
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Re: Homeschooling and the SBC

Postby William Thornton » Tue Jul 02, 2013 2:49 pm

ET wrote: Next adventure in home schooling for us: our home schooler is going to play volleyball this year for the high school she would attend if she went to public school. Tennessee got around this year to passing a law to allow home schoolers to play for the public school in which they are zoned.


About 20 years ago we were homeschooling and asked the school board to allow our son to participate in some extracurricular activity. There were only a handful of HSers in the whole county back then. The state paid the local school system a daily per capita even for HS kids. Even though the system received revenue for our kid who did not attend the public school they turned down our request, the first such request the system had ever received.

I think GA has some laws now that provide for HSers to do extracurricular stuff. HSing is much more mainstream than way back then.
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Re: Homeschooling and the SBC

Postby Timothy Bonney » Tue Jul 02, 2013 4:45 pm

Michael Wrenn wrote:Simply because people want to ignore or deny the Biblical condemnation of sodomy does not change how God views the matter, either. And churches that affirm sodomy have departed the faith and should thus not be considered Christian churches.


Simply because you contend that the Bible condemns homosexuality doesn't mean it does. That's the problem with conservative Christians, you are so darned sure that your interpretation of the Bible is what the Bible says that anyone who disagrees with you is unbiblical.

There is more than one interpretation of what the Bible, particularly Paul is talking about in relationship to sexuality. Equally qualified scholars see Paul talking about pedastry and temple prostitution and not homosexuality as we know it today. They do so from an analysis of the meanings and historic usages of the Koine Greek language that Paul is actually speaking rather than our translations.

By the way Paul also says that people shouldn't marry unless they are burning with passion and are afraid they will take advantage of a young woman. Are we to follow that text literally too or do we read and study to see what Paul's intentions were?

Seeing a different interpretation of scripture is not "ignoring or denying." In fact it can be more faithful than just assuming that what people say about the Bible is true without doing the research and the reading.

We can all play the game "you disagree with my theology therefore you are unbiblical." However, it is a pointless game.
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Re: Homeschooling and the SBC

Postby ET » Tue Jul 02, 2013 10:56 pm

William Thornton wrote:
ET wrote: Next adventure in home schooling for us: our home schooler is going to play volleyball this year for the high school she would attend if she went to public school. Tennessee got around this year to passing a law to allow home schoolers to play for the public school in which they are zoned.


About 20 years ago we were homeschooling and asked the school board to allow our son to participate in some extracurricular activity. There were only a handful of HSers in the whole county back then. The state paid the local school system a daily per capita even for HS kids. Even though the system received revenue for our kid who did not attend the public school they turned down our request, the first such request the system had ever received.

I think GA has some laws now that provide for HSers to do extracurricular stuff. HSing is much more mainstream than way back then.

Yeah, it's much more mainstream these days in my little corner of the world. The first kids we ran into that were home schooled were a couple of girls that used to babysit for us back in the mid-90s. There were in high school at the time and had been home schooled their whole educational life, which meant they started home schooling back before "home schooling was cool"...circa probably 1982-1985.

The girls tried out public school in 10th grade or so....the oldest one couldn't stand it....there was sooooo much wasted time during the school day....taking role, assemblies, etc. She was used to getting up, hitting the lessons by 8 or so and then being done by noon or thereabouts. I think my daughter would be the same way if she went to public high school.....she'd find a lot of wasted time that would drive her crazy.

Back when we were at Bellevue Baptist here in town, we taught 3rd grade Sunday School for a number of years. One year we had about 15 or 20 kids in our class and at least half of them were home schooled.

You want to hear something amusing (at least to me)? I was in a meeting with our pastor some time back and he was talking about the comings and goings of membership and such (we're now in a church with about 400 members). He's actually had someone tell him that they didn't make return visits to the church because the youth group was "only home schoolers". Well, that's not the case, but it was rather interesting for such a statement to be made. I remember in my high school days that the division was more along the private school-public school line and the comment would have been more along the lines of "everybody goes to those private Christian schools", but now it's seemed to have fragmented into a three-way division between home school, private and public school.

We didn't ever do anything like this, but some good friends of ours have home schooled and one of the coolest features of home schooling is, of course, the ability to not be constrained by a school calendar and be "onsite" at the same campus every day. So every October for a number of years they'd rent a house/condo on the beach for a month in October for the same price as a week in the summer and enjoy the beach without all the tourists around. Do a little schoolin'...hit the beach. Very cool.
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