Al Mohler and the Muslim Brotherhood

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Al Mohler and the Muslim Brotherhood

Postby Stephen Fox » Thu Jul 19, 2012 10:55 am

Phenom of a program yesterday on NPR Fresh Air with David Kirkpatrick. Concluding the interview NY Times' writer shared anecdote that coulda come strate out of George Wallace playbook to defeat Albert Brewer in 1970, or Paul Pressler's rallies to takeover the SBC and place folks like Richard Land and Mohler in leadership.

Check the site to frame this discussion.

Here is a comment I submitted to that site:

Great show. I am linking to a baptistdiscussion board baptistlife.com/forums SBC Trends. His remarks about Egyptian salafists are spot on to the method of fundamentalists in the takeover of the Southern Baptist Convention, now morphed at one level to Karl Rove's secret Houston area American Crossroads wealthy donors, and at another point the undebelly of the Tea Party....In remembering his beat on America's religious right, Kirkpatrick may want to keep an eye on Bama Judge Roy Moore's communications director Jay Holland and his assault on Bama Public TV to promote David Barton and his false history of America and its religious evolution. Wake Forest's Melissa Rogers, and Dartmouth's Randall Balmer would be great guests for Fresh Air on this matter. See also Paul Harvey's essay on David Barton at religiondispatches.]


Similarities to Wallace and SBC Takeover from the Transcript
[GROSS: When you were in America, one of the beats you covered for the New York Times was the conservative movement in the U.S., and you wrote some really interesting pieces about the movement. And primarily you were covering the religious right during this period. And now during the days during and after the Arab Spring, you've been reporting in part on, you know, political groups, political movements run by Islamists. And I'm wondering if covering the religious right in the U.S. prepared you in any way for covering, you know, religious political groups in the Middle East?

KIRKPATRICK: I hope so. You know, my evangelical Christian friends are going to be very upset to hear me say this, but I do find some broad similarities between Muslim religious conservatives and Christian religious conservatives - you know, different similarities that come up again and again. The most striking thing to me was during the parliamentary election I went out to a rally by a group of Salafis. Now, Salafis are a group, a faction of the Islamists in Egypt who take a very literal view of the teachings of the Quran. They're to the right of the Muslim Brotherhood by a long shot. And I sat down, you know - we went out to a small village in Giza across the river from Cairo and we pull up past a kind of parking lot except instead of cars it's full of donkey carts.

And we get to a bunch of folding chairs full of men. The women are sitting inside behind, you know, curtained windows listening from inside a building because the sexes are strictly segregated. And the sheik who's speaking starts saying I'm here with you today, because those people over there don't understand you.

They think that with their fancy degrees and their Ph.D.s they know better than you do. But if your son or daughter has studied the good book, they know just as much about everything they need to know to run this country. And we shouldn't stand for that kind of condescension. You deserve more respect than that and you can't listen to the condescension of their liberal media elite.

And you get where I'm going here. If it weren't for the fact that this guy had a long beard, he might've been in suburban San Diego. I mean, the kind of the populist politics of resentment fused with a religious context, the kind of, you know, anti-secular, liberal elite, it's very, very similar to a certain element of the religious right in America.

And I think the Salafis, these very conservative Islamists, did surprisingly well. Everybody was surprised by their success in the parliamentary elections in Egypt. They won about 25 percent of the seats. And my personal instinct is that a lot of that support came as much from the populism of their message, the anti-elite part of their message, as it did from any specific desire to return to a, you know, centuries-old early Islamic morality.

And that's one place where I think the experience of having covered the Christian conservative movement here in the U.S. was very helpful to me, to be able to see that. The other way that the experience comes up a lot, for me, is in the U.S. you see that the question really isn't, you know, are we going to apply religious values to public life. We are.

I mean, the vast majority of Americans want that and you're not going to get very far trying to say, you know, please check your values at the door. The interesting question is what does it really mean. How do we interpret our religious teachings as they apply to public life? And that debate is now unfolding really for the first time and with much grandeur stakes across the Islamic world where you see some people saying, all right, finally, we can have Islamic law.

And what that means is pluralistic constitutional democracy where we separate the clerics from political power because that corrupts both sides. And you have other people saying now wait just a minute. You know, if Islam means anything it means that we're going to apply certain rules and put certain guidelines on democratic political life, or else we're just like the West.

And how that debate gets resolved, I think, has enormous stakes for the ultimate outcome of the Arab Spring.]

Link

http://www.npr.org/2012/07/18/156927297 ... -be-headed
"I'm the only sane {person} in here." Doyle Hargraves, Slingblade
"Midget, Broom; Helluva campaign". Political consultant, "Oh, Brother..."


http://www.foxofbama.blogspot.com or google asfoxseesit
Stephen Fox
 
Posts: 9156
Joined: Mon Dec 24, 2007 8:29 pm

Eunie Smith of Bama tight with Bachmann

Postby Stephen Fox » Thu Jul 26, 2012 5:42 pm

"I'm the only sane {person} in here." Doyle Hargraves, Slingblade
"Midget, Broom; Helluva campaign". Political consultant, "Oh, Brother..."


http://www.foxofbama.blogspot.com or google asfoxseesit
Stephen Fox
 
Posts: 9156
Joined: Mon Dec 24, 2007 8:29 pm


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