Oyster sandwiches

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Oyster sandwiches

Postby Haruo » Sun Dec 02, 2007 12:50 am

I just blogged about the Oyster Boats at Stan's drive-in.

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Re: Oyster sandwiches

Postby Haruo » Sun Dec 02, 2007 12:51 am

I invite discussion of oyster sandwiches. Incidentally, when you order an Oyster Boat at Stan's, she says "It's a sandwich" in a rather discouraged tone of voice. You reply, "I know. I love them."

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Re: Oyster sandwiches

Postby Dave Roberts » Sun Dec 02, 2007 6:57 am

I never had an oyster boat, but I have ordered a shrimp burger along the NC coast. It was good.
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Re: Oyster sandwiches

Postby William Thornton » Sun Dec 02, 2007 8:14 am

Sounds good. Fried oysters are pretty good, stew and oyster dressing also (but I pass on the raw).
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Re: Oyster sandwiches

Postby Tim Dahl » Sun Dec 02, 2007 11:26 pm

Oyster Anything.... EEEEEWWWWWWWW..... (we should have a sickly emote face)

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Re: Oyster sandwiches

Postby Cathy » Mon Dec 03, 2007 1:33 am

Great post Haruo. I had noticed a previous mention that your parents had died before you were grown. Thanks for writing the post and sharing the story of your complicated relationship with oyster boats.
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Re: Oyster sandwiches

Postby David Flick » Mon Dec 03, 2007 3:05 am

Tim Dahl wrote:Oyster Anything.... EEEEEWWWWWWWW..... (we should have a sickly emote face)

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We have one, Tim... Here it is-----> :blech:
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Re: Oyster sandwiches

Postby Haruo » Mon Dec 03, 2007 4:34 am

Cathy wrote:Great post Haruo. I had noticed a previous mention that your parents had died before you were grown. Thanks for writing the post and sharing the story of your complicated relationship with oyster boats.
Thanks, Cathy. Nice to see somebody read past the word "oyster". ;-)

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Re: Oyster sandwiches

Postby Jonathan » Mon Dec 03, 2007 6:38 am

I agree with Cathy. I knew the brief outline of your story but did not remember reading the particulars of your parents' death. Thanks for sharing your experience of wading through incredibly thick memories where a satisfied appetite and unsatisfied history combine with a result that sounded almost like contentedness.

Oyster boats as "soul food". Good stuff.

If I ever get out your way (my wife has an uncle who lives not too far from you, I think), I'll have to have one with you.
Last edited by Jonathan on Mon Dec 03, 2007 11:32 am, edited 1 time in total.
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Re: Oyster sandwiches

Postby William Thornton » Mon Dec 03, 2007 7:49 am

Well, I didn't read past the oyster part...until this morning, sorry.
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Re: Oyster sandwiches

Postby ehart » Tue Dec 04, 2007 12:49 am

Didn't read it at all until just now.

I'm sorry about the loss of your parents in such a tragic way. It's never time to lose parents no matter how long you have had them or how old and sickly they are. I can certainly understand your reticence to eating at Stan's for all those years. I'm also glad you have managed to overcome and reconcile the past with the present. That's hard for most of us to do.
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Re: Oyster sandwiches

Postby Hal Eaton » Tue Dec 04, 2007 4:06 pm

My mother often cooked sweetbreads (pancreatic glands), heart, tongue, brains -- gourmet items now-a-days, but the cheapest cuts of meat during the recession (1930s). However, she never introduced me to oysters.

That came in Hong Kong in 1952. We ate often in the Parisian Cafe of the Metropole Hotel. Oysters a la Rockefeller were offered by the dozen for six dollars HK. At the exchange rate of 6:1, the dozen oysters on the half-shell were one dollar.

Chesapeake oysters are not what they once were; 30 years ago, anybody who was making a trip from Appalachia to the beach was asked to bring back a bushel of oystrers. We left them on the grill until they opened, dragged them through a light cocktail sauce, and checked which fellow gourmands bit 'em before swallowing. Camping on Florida's beach just north of the Kennedy Center, we dug them out of the shallow water, popped them open, and enjoyed.

Some nanny/theologian (I think a vegetarian Adventist) wrote voluminously about the innards of each oyster in an attempt to find scientific reasons why the Good Book forsook the eating of shell fish. If you come across such writing, ignore it, and enjoy your meal.

Meantime, join with me in thanlsgiving to the first man who ate one of them thar thangs.
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Re: Oyster sandwiches

Postby Dave Roberts » Tue Dec 04, 2007 6:44 pm

Like others, I had also not read down the blog. I appreciate you sharing your memories and the ways in which you experienced both the pain and joy. That was a rich posting. I wish you had posted the whole blog here.
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Re: Oyster sandwiches

Postby Jonathan » Tue Dec 04, 2007 8:27 pm

Hal Eaton wrote:My mother often cooked sweetbreads (pancreatic glands), heart, tongue, brains -- gourmet items now-a-days, but the cheapest cuts of meat during the recession (1930s). However, she never introduced me to oysters.

That came in Hong Kong in 1952. We ate often in the Parisian Cafe of the Metropole Hotel. Oysters a la Rockefeller were offered by the dozen for six dollars HK. At the exchange rate of 6:1, the dozen oysters on the half-shell were one dollar.


O.K. very cool. The Metropole HK is now the Metro Park Hotel. Been by there. I don't know which of the restaurants used to be the Parisian Cafe (there are some pictures here. Given how little concern HK seems to have for landmarks, there is probably a lot that has changed.

I'd love to know more about your time in Hong Kong in the 50's. From what my Chinese Hongkongers tell me, HK's rise from regional to worldwide powerhouse occured around the time of the Vietnam war (port location). But around the time you were there, it was just a few years removed from the massive wave of mainlanders pouring across the border during the very short time window that Mao opened (and quickly closed) around 1949. The place must have been fascinating for you. Pictures?
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