I hope this is not typical

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I hope this is not typical

Postby Joseph Patrick » Mon Jul 23, 2018 8:29 pm

From Gerry Milligan ...aka Joseph Patrick

I hope that this article is not typical of Southern Baptist churches, but I am doubtful. https://www.washingtonpost.com/news/nat ... rm=.819c1f
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Re: I hope this is not typical

Postby Haruo » Mon Jul 23, 2018 9:32 pm

I think it's the same article Sandy and I are already discussing in this thread.
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Re: I hope this is not typical

Postby JE Pettibone » Mon Jul 23, 2018 10:19 pm

Haruo wrote:I think it's the same article Sandy and I are already discussing in this thread.


Ed: Hauro, your Link gets me to a blank page.
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Re: I hope this is not typical

Postby Sandy » Mon Jul 23, 2018 11:03 pm

A key statement from the article:

The Washington Post wrote: “As Southern Baptists in this small town, we want our leader to believe like we do,” said Terry Drew, who had chaired the search committee, and three years later, Crum was meeting their highest expectations of what a good Southern Baptist pastor should be.


Is this typical of what Southern Baptists think? This is a First Baptist Church congregation in a small town in the South. A good percentage of Southern Baptist congregations are in small towns in the south. And while it would not be fair to characterize all Southern Baptists this way, the views expressed there are probably "typical" to varying degrees in SBC congregations in most places in the South in particular.

If you notice the photos of the congregation, it is mostly made up of older, white women. The town is 30% African American, but none in any photo of the First Baptist Church. That makes a statement, I think. The author lets the congregants speak for themselves, and doesn't offer much commentary, though provides a little bit of explanation of who is speaking. You get a small slice of life inside a small town SBC church in Alabama during the Trump era.

I've always said that in order for a Christian to support Trump, they either have to ignore, overlook, or justify his immoral, corrupt character, and none of those things are consistent with a stated Evangelical Christian perspective. What you read from the church members in this article is excellent support for that conclusion.
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Re: I hope this is not typical

Postby William Thornton » Tue Jul 24, 2018 4:23 am

My stray thoughts on SBC stuff may be found at my blog, SBC Plodder
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Re: I hope this is not typical

Postby Joseph Patrick » Thu Jul 26, 2018 11:00 am

From Gerry Milligan ...aka Joseph Patrick
The author of the "Get Religion" does not cite any person in opposition to the article while citing Stetzer (spelling?) who agreed with the article in WAPO. Not a good nor relevant article in "Get Religion." After a wee bit of checking I have one question: How far right is "Get Religion?"
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Re: I hope this is not typical

Postby Sandy » Thu Jul 26, 2018 12:25 pm

I have to admit, reading the story, I had similar thoughts to those of the author of the "Get Religion" piece. The largest SBC congregation in the city of Washington, DC is Capitol Hill Baptist Church, where Mark Dever is pastor. It's about 15 blocks from the Post's main building. If you want to get some Southern Baptist perspective on this, why not just hop on the metro and go over there? Except that at Capitol Hill Baptist, it might be much more difficult to find Trump supporters, and it might also be much more difficult to find people who hang on to the myths and misconceptions that are perpetrated, about both Trump and Clinton. So you pick a small town in the south, and it could have been any of several hundred towns where the First Baptist Church is the most prominent edifice in the community, and you go get the interviews.

I'd disagree with the contention that the Post writers did any manipulation of the perspective though. Really, they didn't. They put the circumstances in the context that they found them, and they got quotes. There's no statement from the Post reporters that evaluates any statement, or manipulates the perspective, and they actually did a very good job expressing the way a Baptist church calls a pastor, and what that role means to the people in a small town First Baptist church. The SBC is a diverse denomination, culturally, economically, theologically, racially and politically. And that's really the "essence" or flavor of Southern Baptists. But the congregation of the First Baptist Church of Luverne, Alabama, while not representative of the denomination as a whole, is more than likely a good perceptive slice of what is a declining constituency, but still the predominant one among Southern Baptists.

So when one of the members says that they want their pastor to "believe like we do," that says, at least to me, there's not going to be much in the way of education or change taking place. So things which are true, but which don't fit with their perspective, don't matter.
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