Confederate Monuments

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Confederate Monuments

Postby Dave Roberts » Fri Aug 18, 2017 10:14 am

In response to a friend's post yesterday, I began to think about something. I need Confederate monuments. That's right! I need them. I need them as my call to repentance before God. They call me first to repent of the system my ancestors created to enslave people in order to enrich themselves. Okay, maybe these weren't my physical ancestors, but they were my social and religious ancestors. Second, I need them to remind me to repent of the sins of my religious ancestors who insisted God had given the "curse of Ham" so that He intended for people of African descent to be enslaved. Religious people knew better, but they even created divisions in most of protestant Christianity in order to spew their subjugation theories.

Third, I need the Confederate statues to remind me of the 600,000 Americans who were killed in the Southern Rebellion against the Declaration of Independence and the US Constitution. It was indeed a terrible war of brother against brother with both sides claiming the same God, but was God ever pleased with that war. I had ancestors who fought doing what their leaders had persuaded them was right but who never themselves owned another human being. I need the reminder of how wrong sometimes we can all be. Those statues of anonymous Confederate soldiers are a powerful reminder of how we can be led astray in large masses to do what we would never envision individually under the guise of protecting something.

Fourth, I need the Confederate monuments to remind me of the context in which they were created. Those little date plaques on the bottom often bear two sets of dates. The first mass group was erected in the 1920's across the South in recognition of the height of the power of the KKK as the bastion of white supremacy. This coincided with the rise of Jim Crow laws creating separate waiting rooms at bus and train stations, relegating people of color to the back of the bus, separate water fountains, and separate treatment for those of color in hospitals where they were treated in the basement rather than in the areas where whites were treated. (This I remember personally from one of the hospitals in my home town.) The other time large numbers of Confederate statues were erected was during the 1950's and 1960's following the Brown vx the Board of Education decision ordering the integration of public schools and in the time surrounding the passage of the Civil Rights Act and the Voting Rights Act.

Fifth, I need Confederate monuments to remind me of my ancestors refusal to educate black children. The African-American school in my home town only went through the eighth grade. If a black teen wanted to attend high school, they had to board a bus at 7 a.m. each morning and ride 40 miles one way on what were sometimes treacherous mountain roads. They would be retuning home around 5 p.m. in the afternoon thus denying them a chance to work after school which many needed to do. I remember asking one of the leaders of my community about this. A paraphrase of his answer was that they didn't need more education than the eighth grade to stack lumber, sweep floors, or be domestic help. Whenever I remember that system and that attitude, I must say, "God, forgive me."

Sixth, I need Confederate monuments to remind me of how I would rather perpetuate a lie than to see the truth. Many of those Confederate statues glorify Robert E. Lee, but few of those who erect them talk about Lee's life after the Civil War. In reading a recent work dealing with Lee, I learned more about his work after the War Between the States to seek to reunify the nation. His graciousness toward those against whom he had previously fought is seldom mention nor is his desire to see this be again one nation. Rather than dealing with the truth, we in the South have perpetuated the Myth of the Lost Cause, even glorifying the South as morally and religiously superior to the North. I remember reading one of the Convention Sermons of the SBC in the 1950's that proclaimed that Southern Baptists were "God's last and only hope." God, forgive us for preferring a lie to the truth that "all have sinned and come short of the glory of God.

Seventh, I need Confederate monuments to help me remember how offensive I can be in the face of other Christians. When I see those statues, I am reminded of how I violate the Golden Rule. I do not consider how the descendants of a slave might feel looking at a monument that glorified a history of oppression, division, deprivation, and wrong. I need these monuments as a call to repentance, not just of my personal sins but of my involvement in the corporate sins of my culture. I need the historical content provided by those statues to remember my sins and to hear God's call to repentance.
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Re: Confederate Monuments

Postby William Thornton » Fri Aug 18, 2017 11:40 am

Dave obviously spent a lot of time thinking and writing about this and I respect his feelings and views on it. Some of the points strayed a good bit from reality. I recognize the technique of the title. It's a hook. But I am no less southern and Christian than he and I don't need the statues to remember.

If he needs to repent, that his private matter to take up with God. What I wrote elsewhere was,

"I feel no need to apologize for my Confederate, slave-owning ancestors, neither do I feel compulsion to ignore or keep secret their lives. As an American who was born, not by my own choice, in the Deep South, I have never felt the need to expiate the sordid past. As a Christian I see neither the biblical command for nor the possibility of any vicarious repentance for the sins of my ancestors."

I have trouble enough with my own sins.
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Re: Confederate Monuments

Postby Dave Roberts » Fri Aug 18, 2017 12:47 pm

William Thornton wrote:Dave obviously spent a lot of time thinking and writing about this and I respect his feelings and views on it. Some of the points strayed a good bit from reality. I recognize the technique of the title. It's a hook. But I am no less southern and Christian than he and I don't need the statues to remember.

If he needs to repent, that his private matter to take up with God. What I wrote elsewhere was,

"I feel no need to apologize for my Confederate, slave-owning ancestors, neither do I feel compulsion to ignore or keep secret their lives. As an American who was born, not by my own choice, in the Deep South, I have never felt the need to expiate the sordid past. As a Christian I see neither the biblical command for nor the possibility of any vicarious repentance for the sins of my ancestors."

I have trouble enough with my own sins.

William, I am not writing to expiate for others sins. I do want to expiate for my own attitudes toward certain things in the past. I am complicit, often by silence, in many of things of which I wrote.
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William Thornton and Robert E Lee

Postby Stephen Fox » Fri Aug 18, 2017 12:59 pm

As can be expected William differs on this matter with Marshall Frady, Bonhoeffer scholar Charles Marsh, Duke Divinity School's Curtis Freeman, Timothy Tyson and others.

That said, he expressed himself well. I trust he will be reading the RD dot org Treason post by nightfall and join former Clemson Trustee Chair David Wilkins in that exercise.

Bush 43 ambassador to Canada wife, Susan Clary is from Gaffney. Her first husband died in Viet Nam. My Dad was often a "fourth" for Susan's first mother in law in twice weekly morning tennis doubles outtings in the late 70s.

Either here, or on the other post, would like to hear William talk about how Pressler and Patterson and Adrian Rogers navigated the Lee Atwater link in the treason piece.

And also interested in William's thoughts on Tom Graves, Two Pictures of my Father, Christian Ethics today piece about Robert E Lee and M L King. Confession of ancestral sins is a different topic from what are we gonna do now about Donald Trump and Steve Bannon.
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Re: Confederate Monuments

Postby Rvaughn » Fri Aug 18, 2017 3:58 pm

I respect Dave’s rights and feeling toward needing the statues, but feel no compulsion along the same lines. I’ve thought, said and done many things which required repentance -- but none of which had anything to do with the Confederacy and its statues (as far as I know). Like William, I also feel no to apologize or repent for something someone else did a hundred and more years ago.

There is a lot of current stir about Confederate monuments in the media, but I’d guess that most folks take little notice of them for either good or ill. An NPR/Maris poll indicates that even a plurality of African-Americans (44%) do not think they need to be removed. Charles Barkley, whose thoughts may reflect much of the 44%, says of the statues, “I’ve always ignored them. I’m 54 years old. I’ve never thought about those statues a day in my life. I think if you ask most black people to be honest, they haven’t thought a day in their life about those stupid statues.”
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Re: Confederate Monuments

Postby William Thornton » Fri Aug 18, 2017 5:02 pm

Start pedaling now to get to the SC totality zone. Gaffney is too far. You're good at Furman, Bob Jones, and Honea Path. It'll be an easier trip if you drop all the names before you start out...lessens the load.
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Re: Confederate Monuments

Postby Dave Roberts » Sat Aug 19, 2017 9:29 am

I'm intrigued that no one recognized my irony toward Confederate monuments. The last thing any of the defenders of those monuments wants to consider is seeing statues as a call to repentance. The confessions are real, and I went to too many ball games, both in high school and college where "Dixie" was played even when Black athletes were on the teams. Weren't we highly sensitive to their feelings?
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Re: Confederate Monuments

Postby Jim » Sat Aug 19, 2017 9:31 am

Dave Roberts wrote: I need these monuments as a call to repentance, not just of my personal sins but of my involvement in the corporate sins of my culture. I need the historical content provided by those statues to remember my sins and to hear God's call to repentance.


I imagine you're terribly inconvenienced by sitting in your odious sackcloth and ashes, as was Job, and assume you will park your carcass appropriately at a statue of either R.E. Lee (close-by) or MLK on the Washington Mall. God was pretty tough on Job for his arrogance but maybe He will be more lenient with you. In the meantime, keep the Vaseline handy for the hot spots or pray for rain. Be sure everyone notices your humility by perhaps advertising your great sacrifice...sorta like either flagpole-sitting or a hunger-strike (you can call it “fasting for the cause”). In case the pull-for-repentance occasioned by the precious monuments grows even slightly weak, check out that “wages of sin” verse in the Bible. Happily, you then might just forego the guilt-trip by association and just take Paul's word.
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Re: Confederate Monuments

Postby Dave Roberts » Sat Aug 19, 2017 9:55 am

Jim wrote:
Dave Roberts wrote: I need these monuments as a call to repentance, not just of my personal sins but of my involvement in the corporate sins of my culture. I need the historical content provided by those statues to remember my sins and to hear God's call to repentance.


I imagine you're terribly inconvenienced by sitting in your odious sackcloth and ashes, as was Job, and assume you will park your carcass appropriately at a statue of either R.E. Lee (close-by) or MLK on the Washington Mall. God was pretty tough on Job for his arrogance but maybe He will be more lenient with you. In the meantime, keep the Vaseline handy for the hot spots or pray for rain. Be sure everyone notices your humility by perhaps advertising your great sacrifice...sorta like either flagpole-sitting or a hunger-strike (you can call it “fasting for the cause”). In case the pull-for-repentance occasioned by the precious monuments grows even slightly weak, check out that “wages of sin” verse in the Bible. Happily, you then might just forego the guilt-trip by association and just take Paul's word.


I prefer two other biblical quotes from Jesus that I am convinced ultimately undermined the whole of slavery. "Love your neighbor as yourself," which is actually an OT quote and "Do unto others as you would have them do unto you." If you consider slavery as okay, then you want to be enslaved since you are doing that to others.
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Re: Confederate Monuments

Postby Jim » Sat Aug 19, 2017 11:56 am

Dave Roberts wrote:
Jim wrote:
Dave Roberts wrote: I need these monuments as a call to repentance, not just of my personal sins but of my involvement in the corporate sins of my culture. I need the historical content provided by those statues to remember my sins and to hear God's call to repentance.


I imagine you're terribly inconvenienced by sitting in your odious sackcloth and ashes, as was Job, and assume you will park your carcass appropriately at a statue of either R.E. Lee (close-by) or MLK on the Washington Mall. God was pretty tough on Job for his arrogance but maybe He will be more lenient with you. In the meantime, keep the Vaseline handy for the hot spots or pray for rain. Be sure everyone notices your humility by perhaps advertising your great sacrifice...sorta like either flagpole-sitting or a hunger-strike (you can call it “fasting for the cause”). In case the pull-for-repentance occasioned by the precious monuments grows even slightly weak, check out that “wages of sin” verse in the Bible. Happily, you then might just forego the guilt-trip by association and just take Paul's word.


I prefer two other biblical quotes from Jesus that I am convinced ultimately undermined the whole of slavery. "Love your neighbor as yourself," which is actually an OT quote and "Do unto others as you would have them do unto you." If you consider slavery as okay, then you want to be enslaved since you are doing that to others.


Check again what I wrote and you will discover that I said absolutely nothing about slavery, but you are so obsessed with the subject that every social/religious issue boils down to...yep...slavery. As do the mod-libbers especially, you present Christ as a total WIMP, loving on everybody even though he told his disciples to get swords, a kind of off-with-their-heads approach to evil as applied to selves or loved ones in the face of danger. You apparently have no idea of what Jesus actually said in the “love your neighbor” thing. I DO love my neighbors as I love myself, which allows for not at all. In fact, being inherently sinful (like you), I sometimes can't stand myself even to the extent of self-loathing...but I don't harm myself. I NEVER LOVE myself but you obviously think you are simply enchanting. Jesus also said love “even as I have loved you,” which meant make sacrifices for your neighbors as a result of your love, no matter its definition. That can get bloody and is never popular. Maybe you ought to give some thought to the “do unto others” thing, also. The way I want others to “do unto me” most of the time is simply not harm me, maybe much of the time “just leave me alone.” Jesus valued his “alone time.” Like the “progressives” (code now for democrat party members), self-flagellation (for somebody else's slavery, for example) is the keystone for hypocritical self-righteousness, but without lashing oneself to the point of bleeding, as the Muslim faithful do in their show-off parades of religious purity. So...keep on beating yourself with a mindset of 1865 while others live in 2017.
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Re: Confederate Monuments

Postby Dave Roberts » Sat Aug 19, 2017 4:20 pm

Jim, your last remarks are so over the top, I'm not even going to bother with an answer. In the future, find someone else on whom you want to profess your love.
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Re: Confederate Monuments

Postby Jim » Sat Aug 19, 2017 8:22 pm

Dave Roberts wrote:Jim, your last remarks are so over the top, I'm not even going to bother with an answer. In the future, find someone else on whom you want to profess your love.

Sorry...can't think of anyone just now. Guess it's that “mule with ill-fitting blinders” thing. In my town, Lexington, Ky., a statue of John Breckinridge, former vice president of the U.S. (the youngest then and now) at the old Courthouse, along with one of John Hunt Morgan, have just been voted out of location by the city-parents. Perhaps they can be moved to the Henry Clay Estate just down the road on the same street, except that, using the Council's non-logic, the Estate (tourist-area) will surely have to be demolished since acres of land and a beautiful mansion can't be moved. You would be moved to supernatural repentance at these sites.
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Re: Confederate Monuments

Postby Jim » Sun Aug 20, 2017 2:44 pm

People who are not accustomed to thinking always associate Civil War monuments with slavery and the evil southerners even though there was a sizeable number of slaves in the North, as well as the shipping centers for their transport.

Census in the USA of 1860:
Total population: 31,183,582 (not just the South)
Slaveholders: 393,975 – 8%
slaves: 3,950,528 – 13%, about the same proportion of blacks as now.

Obviously, most of the soldiers on both sides had nothing to do with owning and working slaves. The monuments in both North and South form tributes to individuals who had the brains, brawn and guts to fight for something in which they believed. This was their right. Slavery was not at the top of the list though it was legally eradicated. The monuments represent bravery on both sides – individual and collective bravery every bit as authentic as that of wars both before and after. The monuments should be left standing where they are, if only to remind blacks that white men died freeing their ancestors. The North suffered 642,427 casualties (killed and wounded), nearly all of them white men. My great-grandfather and two great-uncles fought in the Union Army but I believe the monuments should stand even though Great-Grandfather was wounded once and nearly died of disease once. He couldn't be drafted in the neutral state of Kentucky but he joined anyway.
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RE LEE direct Nephew RW Lee on Charlottesville

Postby Stephen Fox » Tue Aug 22, 2017 12:16 pm

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Re: Confederate Monuments

Postby Dave Roberts » Sun Aug 27, 2017 2:53 pm

Rev. Ben Campbell has spent his life ministering in inner-city Richmond. He says it far better than I can.

http://bjconline.org/this-fall-know-your-religious-liberty-rights-at-school-082217/
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Re: Confederate Monuments

Postby Jim » Mon Aug 28, 2017 8:17 am

A delicious irony lies in the fact, concerning the evils of nationalism, that the Washington DC baseball team is officially called the NATIONALS. When I was young, it was called the Senators, a huge slap at the Congressional Representatives, but time goes on. Also ironic is the fact that the NATIONALS are at the top of the standings while the Cincinnati REDS are in the cellar, a clear-cut victory of Nationalism over Communism. Also ironic concerning leadership is the fact that Dusty Baker, the NATIONALS' manager, was the REDS' manager as the job he held before joining Bryce Harper and the gang in Trumpville. Evil NATIONALISTS like me see a faint light (very faint) at the end of the tunnel of wretchedness for the nation and share deep pity for the REDS, my favorite team, which is in bad need of pitchers, thus more millions to hire some. Teams now have interpreters since the Latinos are rapidly taking over the sport, which proves that people with the proper skills are the ones to be allowed as immigrants, something the prez has stressed. Now, when the manager visits the mound with a few un-kind words for his pitcher, a small congregation (infielders and catcher included) is formed - either that or the hand-signals are fun to watch as there is a great chewing and spitting all around, with the ump walking through the mess in order to break up the conflab that gives the pitcher a bit of a rest period while he laughs (inwardly, of course).
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Re: Confederate Monuments

Postby Haruo » Mon Aug 28, 2017 9:08 am

Jim wrote:...there was a sizeable number of slaves in the North, ...

In 1804 New Jersey became the last Northern state to abolish slavery. You must be counting the border states as North. Just because, say, Maryland didn't join the Confederacy doesn't mean it was a Northern state, and the Daughters of the Confederacy are very active there (or were) even though their state legislature didn't participate in their cause.

"1804: With passage of the law excerpted here, New Jersey became the last state in the North to abolish slavery." Howard L. Green, Words that Make New Jersey History: A Primary Source Reader (1995) p 84.

Can you provide counterdocumentation?
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Re: Confederate Monuments

Postby Jim » Mon Aug 28, 2017 11:23 am

Haruo wrote:
Jim wrote:...there was a sizeable number of slaves in the North, ...

In 1804 New Jersey became the last Northern state to abolish slavery. You must be counting the border states as North. Just because, say, Maryland didn't join the Confederacy doesn't mean it was a Northern state, and the Daughters of the Confederacy are very active there (or were) even though their state legislature didn't participate in their cause.

"1804: With passage of the law excerpted here, New Jersey became the last state in the North to abolish slavery." Howard L. Green, Words that Make New Jersey History: A Primary Source Reader (1995) p 84.

Can you provide counterdocumentation?


From the History Channel June 2014: Slavery in Colonial America was hardly just the South’s “peculiar institution.” At its height, the enslaved population in the North topped 40,000, and now new research published by the Hartford Courant sheds additional light on the often-forgotten Colonial history of slavery in New England and reveals that one of the region’s most aristocratic families were active participants in the slave trade. Remember the triangle of Boston-Africa-Carribean. Read the whole article. That number doesn't approach the number in the South but it's significant, especially as it figures hugely on the economy/commerce of the North as it bartered in slavery.

Counter-documentation to what?
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Re: Confederate Monuments

Postby Rvaughn » Mon Aug 28, 2017 3:25 pm

Haruo wrote:
Jim wrote:...there was a sizeable number of slaves in the North, ...
"1804: With passage of the law excerpted here, New Jersey became the last state in the North to abolish slavery." Howard L. Green, Words that Make New Jersey History: A Primary Source Reader (1995) p 84.

Can you provide counterdocumentation?
Some of this can become a semantic discussion of what is "North." Most folks in the South discussing this probably think of any state that remained in the Union as "North." Under that definition, Delaware was the last Union state to abolish slavery. Actually, they didn't abolish it, the 13th amendment did. Delaware did not ratify the 13th Amendment (in that period). They didn't ratify it because of "states' rights," oddly enough. When the 13th Amendment went into effect through enough states ratifying it, slavery was officially abolished in Delaware. This is mostly just a technical discussion, in a way, because Delaware that a large free black population and very few slaves by that time.

Here is what I believe to be a legit well researched article that gives some of that info. Regardless, I think the information is widely available, but regarding your question turns on how one defines "North."
http://www.civildiscourse-historyblog.com/blog/2017/1/3/when-did-slavery-really-end-in-the-north

The following link gives a NY Times 1862 reference to a bill to abolish slavery in Delaware (which did not pass).
http://www.nytimes.com/1862/02/05/news/the-abolition-of-slavery-in-delaware.html
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Re: Confederate Monuments

Postby Haruo » Mon Aug 28, 2017 3:40 pm

Thanks, Robert, I was not brought up to think of Delaware, Maryland, Kentucky, Missouri, I may be missing a couple, as Northern but as Border States.
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Re: Confederate Monuments

Postby Rvaughn » Mon Aug 28, 2017 10:08 pm

I understand. They were without doubt border states. It's just a matter of perspective. My main point is that when Southern people speak of "Northern" states in reference to the Civil War, slavery, etc., is that they very likely are not speaking geographically but speaking of which states were in the Union. Missouri, Kentucky and Maryland, might go either way, according to what folks are thinking. This may vary with how different age groups view it as well.

When we use the same terms differently, we often end up in different locations.
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River of Dark Dreams by Walter Johnson/Roy Moore

Postby Stephen Fox » Tue Aug 29, 2017 11:19 am

For any of you who are serious about the Civil War; that and Robinson's Pulitzer novel Gilead, and EL Doctorow's simply titled The March, Pearl the slave girl unforgettable, the adaptation of which worthy of 100 million dollar Christopher Nolan Treatment.

Here in Bama it looks like we are gonna play it out all over again as it looks like Steve Bannon in your face to Trump and McConnell endorsing Ten Commandments Judge Roy Moore over Luther Strange of the St Mary's On the Highlands Episcopal Church in Bham about as Blue blood liberal as you can get in Bama. Looks like Moore is gonna win going away in the runoff next Tuesday week which brings SEC Commish Greg Sankey and Nick Saban into play.

So lets get this thang settled once and for all!!!!!
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Re: Confederate Monuments

Postby Rvaughn » Mon Sep 04, 2017 9:03 am

Thought this article gave a unique perspective:
I'm a black daughter of the Confederacy, and this is how we should deal with all those General Lees
http://www.latimes.com/opinion/op-ed/la-oe-richardson-black-confederate-history-20170827-story.html

As for my Confederate ancestor, I consider him without bitterness. He was a man of his time, his family, his community and his culture. He probably wasn’t particularly evil — just an ordinary man, without the advantage we have: 152 years’ perspective on the Civil War. I have met a few of his white descendants — my cousins — and we regard each other with genuine affection.

To those who would keep Jeremiah Dial frozen in time, forever trapped at the moment he chose a cause on the wrong side of humanity, I believe you do him a disservice. To those who use him as an excuse to fly the flag of modern-day anti-Semitism, racism and bigotry, you have no right.

To all the bronze Confederate soldiers, in whom I see the image of my great-great-great-grandfather, I would extend this grace. Without resentment or rancor, I would move them into museums and there tell the story of their lives. I would end their utility as flashpoints for racism and division, and, once and for all, allow them to retire from their long service as sentries over a whitewashed history.
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Re: Confederate Monuments

Postby KeithE » Mon Sep 04, 2017 10:01 am

Rvaughn wrote:Thought this article gave a unique perspective:
I'm a black daughter of the Confederacy, and this is how we should deal with all those General Lees
http://www.latimes.com/opinion/op-ed/la-oe-richardson-black-confederate-history-20170827-story.html

As for my Confederate ancestor, I consider him without bitterness. He was a man of his time, his family, his community and his culture. He probably wasn’t particularly evil — just an ordinary man, without the advantage we have: 152 years’ perspective on the Civil War. I have met a few of his white descendants — my cousins — and we regard each other with genuine affection.

To those who would keep Jeremiah Dial frozen in time, forever trapped at the moment he chose a cause on the wrong side of humanity, I believe you do him a disservice. To those who use him as an excuse to fly the flag of modern-day anti-Semitism, racism and bigotry, you have no right.

To all the bronze Confederate soldiers, in whom I see the image of my great-great-great-grandfather, I would extend this grace. Without resentment or rancor, I would move them into museums and there tell the story of their lives. I would end their utility as flashpoints for racism and division, and, once and for all, allow them to retire from their long service as sentries over a whitewashed history.


Placing monuments in museums is a good idea. Would prefer if it was accompanied by words of acceptance of all races.

I especially liked the paragraph in rvaughn’s linked article:

Yet the monuments debate isn’t really about the past. It’s about a present-day assertion of white supremacy and whether our nation is going to stop making excuses and stare it down. Most of the statues, as has been widely discussed, were erected long after Robert E. Lee surrendered at Appomattox. They were hoisted into view to assert white dominance at specific points in time when African Americans gained a measure of political influence — during Reconstruction and the civil rights era. With the bronzes came domestic terrorism, lynchings, bombings and cross burnings. The current uptick in neo-Nazi and white supremacist activity was entirely predictable. With clockwork precision it surged at the time of the nation’s first African American president.
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Re: Confederate Monuments

Postby Sandy » Mon Sep 04, 2017 3:43 pm

Excellent article linked by Rvaughn. This particular paragraph hits the nail on the head.

Yet the monuments debate isn’t really about the past. It’s about a present-day assertion of white supremacy and whether our nation is going to stop making excuses and stare it down. Most of the statues, as has been widely discussed, were erected long after Robert E. Lee surrendered at Appomattox. They were hoisted into view to assert white dominance at specific points in time when African Americans gained a measure of political influence — during Reconstruction and the civil rights era. With the bronzes came domestic terrorism, lynchings, bombings and cross burnings. The current uptick in neo-Nazi and white supremacist activity was entirely predictable. With clockwork precision it surged at the time of the nation’s first African American president.


It took two hundred years of American history to finally root out institutional slavery. The idea that the white race's superiority to others justified their subservient role in slavery took generations to change, though it did change slowly, especially for those to whom slavery was not an economic "necessity" from their perspective. The author is correct in stating that if the statues and monuments are commemorations of "history," then they belong in museums, or perhaps in a place like Gettysburg, where they do indeed commemorate a battle. They don't belong on public property, where their presence confirms the racism and bigotry that were behind the ideology at the time they were erected.

The last sentence is also right on target. We've just emerged from eight years of the presidency of an African American. Both times he ran, the racist rhetoric was rampant. It clearly infuriated and enraged the white supremacist, "white Christian America," that an African American President succeeded in gathering more votes than any other individual in the history of world democracy, and won a resounding approval of the American people when he was re-elected. His successful and stable eight year presidency will go down in history as one of the most successful of the modern era.

Need proof that this irritates and enrages his opponents? Look at the rhetoric. The rise of the alt right, the fact that the current President brought at least three known white supremacists onto his White House staff, the inflation of the small, scattered, tiny groups labelled "antifa" into some kind of rival movement to the KKK, Neo-Nazis and Alt Right, and the use of their existence to justify the instigated violence of the white supremacists. All diversion. All confirmation of the success of the Obama presidency. Look at Jim's runs of verbal diarrhea. That alone confirms everything I've said here.
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